Irene Aarons – accepting diabetes with words

Poet and writer, Irene Aarons (nom de plume – Irene Emanuel), tells us how writing poetry about her medical conditions, including Type 2 diabetes, has helped her comes to term with them.


Irene Aarons (75) lives in Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape. She has three children, four step children, three grand-children and nine step grand-children.

Irene not only has Type 2 diabetes. She has chronic allergic asthma; a hernia; high blood pressure; rhinitis; osteoarthritis, and she is on medication for all these conditions.

Though, she explains that the upside of all the above is that she has material to work with; many of her poems are about medical matters.

“I live the best life that I can, by finding the funny side of any limitations that there are. The poetry process gives me the chance to make light of a serious condition. By writing it down, I understand that this illness (diabetes) is not the end of my life but the beginning of new experiences. Poetry gives me an understanding that there is life after all my ailments; and whatever else finds me.”

“I always know that there are people far worse off than me. At least I am able to laugh at myself and write poetry that might make someone else laugh. One of my greatest joys is presenting a poetry talk to adults and children; to having them come up to me afterwards and telling me that my words have helped them in some way,” Irene explains.

Family history of diabetes

Irene was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in December 2008, at the age of 64. “I was vaguely expecting it as my mother, two uncles and an aunt all had diabetes. My oldest brother had Type 1 as well as his son. Since my diagnosis, another nephew has been diagnosed with Type 1. So, it definitely runs on the maternal side of my family.

After seventeen years of marriage to her second husband, Irene became a widow, in 2000, when he died of diabetic complications (Type 2). “My second husband was on dialysis for about three years, had lost the sight in one eye and was quite ill for a long time,” she explains. “He was diagnosed when he was in his twenties. But refused to take pills and carried on as if there was no problem at all. He lived life to the full and took no notice of his condition.”

“By the time I married him, he was still a heavy smoker and a fearless “anything-goes” person. When he finally gave in (I pressured him), it was too late. From his mid-fifties, he suffered from peripheral neuropathy, lost the sight in one eye, had a heart attack and then a multiple bypass, which made him give up smoking. His kidneys were damaged and he had to go for dialysis three times a week.”

“He died in his sixties. An early death which could have been delayed had he taken better care of himself. I supported him by going to support group meetings and ensuring that he followed a healthy way of eating. I helped him wherever I could by supporting him in his business and looking after all the children.”

Diabetes management

Currently, Irene is on 1000mg Glucophage twice a day. “Having diabetes is not a problem but rather a challenge. But a challenge that I accept to overcome every day,” she explains.

“The downside of diabetes is that I have to be cautious about what I am able to eat safely. I do cheat. But as I get older, I find that I eat less and very plain food. However, I admit that my downfall is a Steers hamburger, which I do treat myself to about once a month.”

Irene certainly does see the humour in everything. The proof is in the train of thought regarding diabetic food items. “I am curious as to why the cost of diabetic food is always so expensive, considering that half the ingredients are left out.”

She adds that she prefers Hermesetas sweeteners. But since they are imported from Switzerland, they seem to be harder to get. For this reason, she uses Equal sweetener instead.

Exercise doesn’t form part of Irene’s daily regime. Though, she adds “I do park far from mall entrances so that I can walk a fair amount. I do enjoy walking and sightseeing, especially if I am somewhere that I have not been before.”

Keeping busy is the way to go

The 76-year-old is officially retired. Though, she  keeps herself very busy. She is the bookkeeper for a family business, which involves at least two days a week. She also offers her time in two different charity shops, twice a week. Lastly, she always avails herself for talks, let it be on poetry or health.

“I have always been willing to talk to people on subjects, ranging from poetry to books, health, or whatever is needed. I have given talks at schools, clubs and societies. My favourite being schools because I have written poetry on rape, babies, abuse and topics that children can relate to. I am adamant that reading is the pathway to becoming informed and a useful member of society.

Publications

Irene has published four poetry anthologies. The poet has also had poetry and short stories published in both local and overseas books, as well as newspaper articles published in South Africa. She has won poetry awards and an award for general success in the publishing world.

See two of her poems below.

CHRONICALLY CHALLENGED

By Irene Emanuel

I’m working and walking

though chronically challenged;

I’m thinking and talking

though chronically challenged;

I’m laughing and crying

though chronically challenged;

I’m sitting and lying

though chronically challenged;

My insides are messed

and chronically challenged;

My outsides are dressed

though chronically challenged.

The list of what’s challenged

is endlessly long

is medical science

going to write me a song?

In medical books, I’m living proof,

though chronically challenged

I’m still waterproof.

I’ve asthma, diabetes and rhinitis too,

hernia, depression and no-one to sue;

Though chronically challenged,

and living on pills;

I know that my life

is still full of thrills.

So hit me again, what else is in store?

though chronically challenged,

at least I don’t snore.

 

PILLORIED

By Irene Emanuel

I am a rainbow ghost, see-through in the light;

A conglomeration of multi-coloured pills

that prevent me from becoming a real ghost.

The pills play music tattoos on my skeleton

as they race down my gullet, looking for signage

direction to the weak spot.

I wonder what the outcome would be if the signs got scrambled?

Would my diabetes become asthmatic?

Would my high blood pressure run into the blood thinner and become watery?

Would that increase the water on my lungs and cause flooding?

What would happen if there was a traffic jam?

Would the various pills just give up, dissolve into a heap and suffer a melt-down?

Would my body rebel, fight back, expel the pills, lie down and fade out?

A bitter pill to swallow is the fact that I am chained forever, to staying alive with pills.

MEET OUR EXPERT


Laurelle Williams is the Editor at Word for Word Media. She graduated from AFDA with a Bachelor of Arts Honours degree in Live Performance. She has a love for storytelling and sharing emotions through the power of words. Her aim is to educate, encourage and most of all show there is always hope. Feel free to email Laurelle on [email protected]


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